Aboriginal Hostels Limited Annual Report

2010–11

Aboriginal Hostels Limited is alert to the cultural sensitivities of featuring the images or names of people who have recently died.

If any image or name in this report causes distress, the company offers its sincere apologies.

Our highlights and achievements in 2010–11

Highlights

Achievements

Opportunities, challenges and priorities for 2011–12 and beyond

Opportunities

Father and son, Marcus and Romanius Lawson, enjoying their lunch at Daisy Yarmirr Hostel in Darwin

Challenges

Priorities

Letter of transmittal

Contents

Section 1

Company overview

Mother Sandra Mills and her children (from top: Ellen, Solomon and Trinity) at Kuiyam Hostel—Cairns

1 Company overview

1.1 Message from the Chairperson

Kevin Smith

Chairperson

Over the years, I have taken a keen interest in the development of Aboriginal Hostels Limited as a significant provider of services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It was with great pleasure that I accepted the interim position of Chairperson on 14 June 2011, pending the substantive appointment of the Chairperson.

AHL provides important opportunities and support for Indigenous Australians to achieve better lives and better futures. Its experience in providing a range of accommodation options across the country positions the company to make a real difference and to deliver practical results that reduce disadvantage.

As part of this practical difference, in 2010–11 AHL provided more than 487,000 person/nights of accommodation to people living away from home to access services. It provided three meals a day to most of its clients and ensured that they made contact or engaged with health services, schools, Centrelink, homemaker services, legal aid and other services. It provided essential financial support to 47 non-government organisations providing similar accommodation services. It worked in partnership with the Australian Government and state and territory governments to increase the supply of accommodation and related services.

AHL’s focus in 2010–11 was on consolidation and structural reform. Major systems and operating improvements were made, ranging from a national accommodation booking system linked directly into financial reporting through a revised quality assurance system to the opening of three new hostels.

AHL’s direction over the next decade is clearly one of service improvement and expansion. It is uniquely placed, being staffed predominantly by Indigenous Australians, with a presence in 69 locations around the country, and with strong links with other agencies, departments, non-government organisations and private sector companies.

In this foreword, I want to pay credit to Elaine McKeon, the outgoing Chairperson, who has worked tirelessly in many roles for her people. Words are inadequate to describe the contribution she has already made, and her decision to step aside from the AHL role does not in any way mean that she will cease that contribution. Elaine, you are an incredible role model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and for Australia.

As background, I am of the Meriam people of the Torres Strait with connections to Ugar and Erub and joined the AHL board as a director in July 2010. During 2010–11 two new Indigenous people joined the Board of Directors: Vanessa Elliott, a Jaru woman from the Kimberley in Western Australia, and Kerrynne Liddle, an Arrernte woman from Alice Springs in the Northern Territory. Both have already shown considerable understanding of and commitment to the work of AHL. Their skills, together with those of other directors, have given me great confidence that AHL is in sound hands.

Roger Barson and AHL Central Australia staff at the Apmere Mwerre Visitor Park opening day in February 2011

The management team of AHL have responded to the strategic objectives set by government, and there has been considerable reform of AHL processes and activities with one simple goal—to provide the best and most affordable accommodation possible to Indigenous Australians who, through circumstances not of their own making, have to move away from their homes and extended families to access the sorts of services most other Australians take for granted.

Governments are certainly acting to extend and improve the range of services in towns and regional centres and to ensure that they are available to Indigenous Australians. Most people accept that, in our vast and remote regions, not every service will be available close to home. Improved regional services are part of the solution, but will be inadequate as long as there is nowhere for people to live or stay while using those services. AHL is here to meet that gap, and here for the long haul. With almost 38 years of experience, AHL is determined to contribute to Better Lives, Better Futures for Indigenous Australians.

In closing and on behalf of my colleagues on the Board, I would like to thank the many clients, staff and stakeholders who contributed to a successful 2010–11. I very much look forward to working with everyone in the forthcoming financial year.

Kevin Smith

5 October 2011

1.2 Message from the Chief Executive Officer

Roger Barson

Chief Executive Officer

I want to open this annual report ‘message’ by paying my respects to our staff—especially those involved in the actual delivery of our services around the country—and to acknowledge the willingness and enthusiasm with which they go about their work.

Governments in this country are striving to close the gap in Indigenous disadvantage, and continue to develop and implement appropriate policies and programs to do that. Within that broad framework, Aboriginal Hostels Limited works at the individual and family level and seeks to provide direct and real opportunity.

The work that we do in providing short-term accommodation to Indigenous Australians directly supports people who must live away from their homes, families, communities and traditional land to access basic services—things that most other Australians take for granted. It is a simple objective, but one that involves many twists and turns.

Change is a fact of life in a dynamic company in today’s business environment and, while AHL is wholly owned by the Australian Government, it faces the same challenges as any other company meeting both shareholders’ and customers’ expectations. And 2010–11 has been an amazing year!

Essentially, in 2010–11 we set ourselves four major objectives: to ensure that we do everything in the most effective and efficient way; to stay within budget; to reconfigure existing services and commence new ones to meet changing demand; and to provide better service to our clients. We have achieved each of those aims, but we can and will go further.

Many of AHL’s operating systems have been revised or replaced. We have our first national accommodation booking and accounting system, similar to that in use in other hostel and guest house companies. We have started to centralise ‘back office’ functions that free up direct staff to focus on actual services and client needs. We are progressively installing solar power (hot water and electricity) in each of our facilities. We are moving to the 21st century with credit card and electronic payment facilities. Cloud computing technology, improved internet and communications tools and real-time reporting of bookings and expenditures mean that we are understanding our business in real time.

Staying within budget continues to be a challenge. The core funding for AHL, which comes from funds appropriated by the Australian Government, rose by 1.6 per cent in 2010–11, while an ‘efficiency dividend’ reduced our funding by 3.25 per cent. Most of AHL’s expenditure is on direct services, and the efficiencies referred to above are essential if AHL is to be able to function in the coming year without a reduction in services.

We are fortunate that we have been able to secure new business that we operate under contract and for which costs are fully covered. In the past 12 months, we started to operate three new facilities in Alice Springs, each funded under new collaborative arrangements with the Northern Territory Government. A further two facilities are under construction.

Other negotiations with state governments and the private sector are well advanced and are likely to lead to further new services in the coming year. At the same time, we have rationalised our asset holdings to enable us to focus on new and emerging needs.

The removal of some administrative workload has enabled staff in the regional offices to provide more direct support to hostel managers and their staff. Our new quality assurance approach, using scheduled and random assessments, is going to provide better documented oversight and confidence that every one of our services is meeting minimum standards of comfort, amenity and appropriateness—and is simply a nice place to be.

In closing, I want to return to Closing the Gap in Indigenous disadvantage. AHL’s role is not one of broad policy or intervention at the societal level, but in our direct and first-hand engagement with those who want something better for themselves and their families.

We seek to assist individuals to improve their lives and change their futures. We do so through the efforts of each and every one of our staff, many of whom know from personal experience the steep and rocky road to independence, self-reliance and contribution. My thanks go again to every one of you, and to the guidance and support shown by my Chairperson, Elaine McKeon, and the directors of AHL over the past year.

Roger Barson

5 October 2011

Victor and Josiah Johnson at Corroboree Hostel—Katherine

AHL Executive (from left): Dr Kamlesh Sharma—Company Secretary, Russell Lane—Operations, Jeff Svigos—Business Development

1.3 Governance summary

Legislation

Aboriginal Hostels Limited is a company limited by guarantee. The Australian Government, through the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, is the sole member. AHL’s constitution is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001.

At 30 June 2011, AHL also operated in compliance with the following legislation:

Corporate governance

The company operates within a governance framework, following the Australian National Audit Office best practice guide on corporate governance principles. Table 1 indicates the minimum number of Board and committee meetings held throughout the year.

Table 1: Board and committee meetings, 2010–11

Committee name

Number of meetings

Board

6

Audit and Risk Management

3

Executive Management

52

Senior Managers

52

Operations Management

5

Regional Managers

5

National OH&S

5

Internal committees and meetings

Community consultations

AHL promotes community involvement, and in 2010–11 continued to strengthen its good relationships with Indigenous communities. Discussion of issues of concern to communities played a pivotal role in AHL’s decision-making. Regional managers continued to take an active part in community events at many locations as part of their work.

In 2010–11, community barbecue meetings were held in conjunction with AHL board meetings. Hostel open days and NAIDOC functions were held at many locations to increase community knowledge of AHL and its hostels and to provide opportunities for community input. Other hostels extended a welcome to community members through barbecues, breakfasts and other functions.

Meeting of the Wadeye Boarding Facility Advisory Committee at Peppimenarti—Northern Territory

Corporate planning

AHL’s annual Strategic Planning Day was held in February 2011. Participants included the AHL Board of Directors, the Executive, divisional managers and regional managers. The meeting focused on finalising the 2011–13 Corporate Plan, which is a key strategic document linking policy with implementation.

Strategies continue to be guided by the renewed commitment of all Australian governments, through the Council of Australian Governments, to closing the gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Social justice and equity

AHL’s policy is to provide culturally appropriate and affordable accommodation to Indigenous people. The company’s tariffs will continue to be set at affordable levels for recipients of Centrelink benefits. A higher rate is charged for employed persons.

Customer Service Charter

AHL continues to operate under its Customer Service Charter, which includes a service guarantee and a commitment to listen and respond to customer views. The charter contains a detachable portion ’What do you think of our services?’—through which customers can provide positive and negative feedback directly to AHL. Copies of the charter are readily available in printed form and on the company’s website.

Complaints mechanism

AHL’s complaints handling system encourages public feedback regarding our service delivery. Part of this system is a 24-hour complaints hotline and an email address which are advertised on the company’s website and monitored daily.

A small proportion of complaints are received by letter or other means. During 2010–11, 59 per cent (64 out of 108) of complaints were received via the complaints hotline. This was a 10 per cent decrease from 2009–10.

In 2010–11, most complaints received related to resident dissatisfaction with the way staff interacted with them. Other complaints related to service standards, resident issues and tariffs. Some of the more complex complaints required the involvement of a regional manager and, on occasion, involved Central Office staff.

AHL aims to respond to all complaints within 24 hours. For further information about complaints, see the AHL Complaints Policy 2011, which is available on the company’s website.

The complaints system is under the direct oversight of Internal Audit, which instigates investigations of significant breaches.

Management of ethical standards

Directors are required to follow best-practice principles of corporate governance, consistent with the Australian National Audit Office’s Better practice guide on public sector governance.

Our employees are bound by standards of ethical behaviour communicated in the APS Values and Code of Conduct for employees. For more information, see Appendix 4: Code of Conduct.

Commonwealth Ombudsman

Anyone with concerns about the company’s actions is entitled to make an individual complaint to the Commonwealth Ombudsman. The Ombudsman will determine whether the company has incorrectly, through unjust, discriminatory or unfair actions, disadvantaged a person and may recommend the implementation of alternative administrative processes.

During 2010–11, the Commonwealth Ombudsman investigated two complaints about the company’s administrative practices. In both cases, the Ombudsman recommended improvements, which were subsequently implemented. Further information on the role of the Commonwealth Ombudsman can be obtained from the Ombudsman’s website
(www.ombudsman.gov.au).

Privacy

AHL seeks to comply with the 11 information Privacy Principles established under section 14 of the Privacy Act 1988. Australian Government agencies must comply with the principles in their handling of personal information in their possession. Like other government agencies, AHL is required to maintain a record setting out:

Those records, called Personal Information Digests, can be found on the website of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (www.privacy.gov.au).

Internal audit and fraud

AHL has procedures and processes for the prevention, detection, investigation and reporting of fraud. All matters referred to or detected by Internal Audit are properly evaluated for further investigation.

Risk management

AHL’s risk management strategy is based on methods described in the AS/NZS 4360:2004 risk management standard. The standard is the international leader in providing generic guidance on risk management for every enterprise, large or small, public or private.

Competitive tendering and contracting for accommodation

The company adheres to the Australian Government’s contestability policy and the requirement for value for money in service delivery. AHL does not compete with community organisations in tender or similar processes. AHL prefers community organisations to provide accommodation in identified areas of need. However, there are instances when AHL is the preferred provider—usually when there is no suitable community provider.

Figure 1 shows the company structure.

Figure 1: Company structure

At 31 August 2011.

1.4 Who we are and what we do

AHL is a company wholly owned by the Australian Government. It operates within the Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs portfolio. At 30 June 2011, AHL had an independent non-executive board of six directors.

AHL was established in 1973 as a national network of hostels providing safe, culturally appropriate and affordable accommodation for Indigenous Australians who must live away from home in order to access services and economic opportunity.

Today, AHL continues to assist individuals to improve their lives and change their futures. It does so through the efforts of each and every staff member, many of whom have first-hand experience of the difficulties Indigenous Australians face in attaining independence, self-reliance, education and employment. With an increased emphasis on supporting Indigenous Australians to achieve better economic and social outcomes for themselves and their families, AHL remains centred on its clients’ needs.

AHL’s key purpose is to improve Indigenous quality of life through the delivery of affordable, safe, comfortable and culturally appropriate accommodation to enable access to education, employment, health and other services. It does this informed by its values of:

At 30 June 2011, AHL directly operated and administered 69 hostels and houses, and provided additional grant funding for 47 community-operated hostels.

AHL provided more than 487,000 person/nights of accommodation to people living away from home to access services. It provided three meals a day to most of its clients and ensured that they made contact or engaged with the services they needed.

Our hostels and houses offer safe, secure accommodation where positive behaviour in a social and learning environment is encouraged. Hostels are able to provide access to interpreter services where necessary, including for residents who need information about their rights and responsibilities while staying in one of our hostels.

All residents must pay a tariff in advance and AHL has a ‘no-pay, no-stay’ policy. Residents are charged a tariff that is affordable for recipients of Centrelink benefits. The Australian Government provides funds to cover the gap between tariff income and the cost of providing the hostel services.

AHL is one of the largest providers of employment and training for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. At 30 June 2011, AHL had 559 employees, of whom 77 per cent were Indigenous.

Table 2 highlights the reasons why people stay with us.

Table 2: Why AHL residents stay with us

Reason

Description

Needing short-term accommodation

AHL provides short-term accommodation in towns and cities for individuals and families seeking permanent employment and housing, taking up employment, or meeting general business and other commitments away from their homes and communities. Many residents in these hostels stay with us until they are able to access long-term accommodation.

AHL provides crisis management accommodation for homeless Indigenous youth and adults, helping them to attain the necessary life skills for independent living within a wider community.

Needing accommodation while accessing secondary or tertiary education

AHL provides secondary and tertiary students with accommodation which is located relatively close to the educational facility. AHL encourages students to complete their high school education and go onto tertiary studies. Hostel staff provide transitional support to students who wish to access additional training and potential employment pathways.

AHL provides longer term accommodation for tertiary students who have enrolled in certificate and degree courses.

Seeking training and employment options

AHL provides accommodation and other necessary support to Indigenous people aged between 16 and 24 years, particularly those from rural and remote areas, who are participating in apprenticeships, traineeships and higher education.

Needing accommodation while accessing health services

AHL provides hostels that cater specifically for Indigenous people who require access to renal dialysis treatment at local renal medical centres and hospitals.

AHL also provides temporary accommodation and support for individuals and families who must leave their communities to access health services, including antenatal and postnatal care.

AHL has limited accommodation facilities for elderly Indigenous people with dedicated staff who assist residents to live their lives with dignity.

Students at Fordimail Secondary Education Hostel Katherine (from left): Jasmine Huddleston, Ailemaer Paddy and Chantelle Venables

1.5 How we performed

This section provides information on resources, expenditures and results achieved.

Portfolio Budget Statements

The 2010–11 Portfolio Budget Statements provided information on how AHL’s resources would be used to contribute to its outcome and output group.

Figure 2: Outcome and Programs

During 2010–11 AHL commenced the operation of hostel facilities under contract to the Northern Territory Government. The resources for this were not included in the 2010–11 Portfolio Budget Statements.

These facilities are:

Akangkentye Hostel (previously known as Mt Gillen House) which provides accommodation for people normally resident in the Alice Springs Town Camps whose accommodation is under renovation or replacement. The facility is owned by the Northern Territory Government and has been operated by AHL since November 2010.

Apmere Mwerre Visitors Park which was constructed under the Alice Springs Transformation Project and provides up to 150 places per night for visitors to Alice Springs. The facility is owned by the Northern Territory Government and has been operated by AHL since February 2011.

Table 3: Performance against Portfolio Budget Statements deliverables and key indicators

 

Outputs

 

Program 1.1

Program 1.2

PBS deliverables

Average number of guests per night (occupancy percentage)

Target

70%

70%a

Actual

74%

82%a

Number of actual guest per night (average capacity or beds available)

Target

1,655b

1,333c

Actual

1,983d

819e

Percentage of guests satisfied with accommodation (per cent)

Target

75%

75%

Actual

90%

86%

PBS key indicators

Average operating cost per guest per night ($)

Target

$36

$5

Actual

$57

$7

Average revenue per person per night

Target

$7

$5

Actual

$6

$7

a Not a PBS deliverable but provided for information.

b Described in the PBS as ‘number of actual guest nights’.

c Described in the PBS as ‘number of beds’.

d Includes capacity of Akangkentye Hostel and Apmere Mwerre Visitors Park opened in 2010–11.

e Five community-operated hostels ceased to receive funding in 2010–11.

Table 4 provides supplementary information and compares occupancy rates by room and by bed. It reflects a growing shift in guest preferences to not share rooms.

Table 4: Room useage, company-operated hostels and houses (Program 1.1)

Sample Night 29 June 2011

 

Total guest beds available

1,870

Total guest rooms available

870

Total guest beds used

856

Total guest rooms used

732

Percentage of available beds used

73%

Percentage of available rooms used

84%

Operating Revenue and Expenditure

Table 5 shows how AHL was resourced and how these funds were used.

Table 5: Operating resources and expenditure 2010–11

 

Budget 2010–11

Actual 2010–11

Variation

Budget 2011–12

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Revenue

Ordinary Services

38,476

38,476

-

38,481

Dept Health and Ageing a

1,700

1,935

235

2,300

Dept Education, Employment and Workplace Relations b

4,065

15,782

11,717

3,533

Other Governments c

1,529

839

(690)

1,948

Other sources d

11,799

15,249

3,450

13,909

Total Operating revenue

57.569

72,281

14,712

60,171

Expenditure

Program 1.1 – Company Operated

51,419

63,279

(11,860)

51,924

Program 1.2 Community Operated

6,150

5,491

659

6,500

Total Operating Expenditure

57,569

68,770

(11,201)

58,424

Operating Result e

-

3,511

3,511

1,747

a Revenue from the Department of Health and Ageing relates to the Hetti Perkins Nursing Home.

b Revenue from the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations relates to the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program ($3,666,000) and for the construction of Wadeye Secondary Education Boarding Facility ($12,116,000).

c Revenue from other governments is for the Akangkentye Hostel and Apmere Mwerre Visitors Park.

d Other revenue includes tariffs charges, donations and miscellaneous income.

e The operating result is affected by timing in arrival of funds – see the Financial Statements for further information.

Financial summary

Income

AHL’s total income of $79.20 million in 2010–11 increased from $56.84 million in the previous year. The $22.79 million increase includes $13.23 million in grants from the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) for the Indigenous Mothers Accommodation Facility in Darwin, funding from DEEWR for the Wadeye Boarding Facility in the Northern Territory and funding from the Northern Territory Government for services in Alice Springs. In addition, $6.92 million Government capital grant funding was provided.

Expenditure

AHL’s total expenditure of $68.77 million in 2010–11 increased by $14.33 million from the previous year.

Table 6 summarises AHL’s financial performance for the five years to 2010–11. For further information on AHL’s finances, see Section 5: Financial statements.

Table 6: Financial comparison, 2006–07 to 2010–11

 

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Government operating subsidy provided

38,811

39,218

41,009

45,280

38,476

Government capital grant provided

650

650

a-

a-

6,920

Tariff income

8,429

9,298

9,887

9,775

11,557

Other income

1,238

1,465

1,749

1,785

22,248

Total income

49,128

50,631

52,645

56,840

79,201

Payment to community hostels

8,441

8,024

7,933

6,166

5,491

Wages and salaries

23,497

23,959

23,905

24,759

28,988

Other company expenditure

17,921

19,756

18,967

23,521

34,291

Total expenditure

49,859

51,739

50,805

54,446

68,770

Capital available

54,669

70,899

77,371

81,161

88,081

a No capital grant provided

In 2010–11, AHL provided 1,870 beds in hostels and 123 beds in houses (under the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program), for a total capacity of 1,993 beds. This exceeded the target number in the Portfolio Budget Statements by 199 beds.

AHL operated two new hostels in Alice Springs and closed two hostels in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. Table 7 summarises AHL’s hostels and houses performance for the five years to 2010–11.

Table 7: Performance comparison, company-operated hostels and houses, 2006–07 to 2010–11

Company-operated hostels and houses

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

Number of hostels

49

50

50

53

55

Number of houses

23

22

22

14

14

Total hostels and houses

72

72

72

67

69

Guest capacity—hostels
(beds per night)

1,466

1,560

1,581

1,655

1,870

Guest capacity—houses
(beds per night)

182

204

199

120

123

Total beds

1,648

1,764

1,780

1,775

1,993

Total subsidy—hostels
(per bed per night)

$45.64

$43.86

$47.60

$56.98

$54.31

Total cost—hostels
(per bed per night)

$58.63

$57.87

$58.97

$74.19

$60.44

Average bed occupancy—hostels (per night)

74%

74%

76%

72%

78%

Average bed occupancy—houses (per night)

26%

37%

63%

45%

48%

Average room occupancy—hostels (per night)

a

a

94%

77%

b 90%

a No data on rooms collected.

b At 30 June 2011.

Although the Portfolio Budget Statements guest capacity target is 1,333 available beds per night for community-operated hostels, the actual number of community-operated beds available during 2010–11 was 819. This reduction occurred because AHL ceased funding to five community-operated hostels during the financial year. Table 8 summarises the performance of community-operated hostels for the five years to 2010–11.

Table 8: Performance comparison, community-operated hostels, 2007–08 to 2010–11

Community-operated hostels

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

Number of hostels

71

66

51

47

Guest capacity (beds per night)

1,455

1,387

1,125

819

Average bed occupancy (per night)

77%

72%

67%

82%

Hostels

The occupancy rate of company-operated hostels and houses was 74 per cent (compared with 70 per cent in 2009–10). Of the many factors that have contributed to that increase, the two major ones were as follows:

The average occupancy rate for each program increased from the previous year. Table 9 shows the average occupancy for each program from 2007–08 to 2010–11.

Table 9: Occupancy rate per night, comparison by program, 2007–08 to 2010–11

Program

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

Program 1.1—company-operated hostels

74%

76%

72%

78%

Program 1.1—company-operated houses

37%

63%

45%

48%

Total

75%

73%

70%

74%

Program 1.2—community-operated hostels

77%

72%

67%

82%

Major maintenance

During 2010–11, the company expended $1.92 million to maintain its building assets. About 95 per cent of the 2010–11 major maintenance works program was completed on schedule.

Staff

At 30 June 2011, AHL had 559 staff. Total staff numbers had progressively increased over the previous four years. However, during 2010–11 the total number of staff remained constant. The number of Indigenous staff decreased slightly, whereas the number of female staff remained reasonably constant. Table 10 shows movements in staff numbers over the past five years, from 2006–07 to 2010–11.

Table 10: AHL staff statistics comparison, 2006–07 to 2010–11

 

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

Number of staff

492

518

520

559

559

Percentage of Indigenous staff

82%

84%

82%

78%

77%

Percentage of female staff

63%

65%

65%

65%

66%

Reservation Management System training in Sydney, 21-23 March 2011

1.6 What our residents think

Determining how well the needs of clients are understood and met is a key part of the business of any organisation. The resident survey is one of a number of methods AHL uses to gauge satisfaction with company-operated and community-operated facilities.

The survey was conducted in every region across Australia. Responses were received from 95 of the 113 hostels and houses operating at the time of the survey. The total number of completed responses received was 1,191, an increase of 387 (48%) from 2009–10.

For the first time respondents were given the option of completing the survey online or on paper. All secondary and tertiary education students were asked to complete the survey online. In total, 18 per cent of survey responses were received online and 82 per cent on paper.

Survey questions referred to hostel premises, amenities, staff, management and wrap-around service advice. Specific questions were included concerning the type of accommodation, food, safety and security, and the cultural environment.

As in previous years, the majority of respondents were happy with their stay at AHL hostels and houses. A very small number of respondents expressed dissatisfaction with a particular AHL hostel service and remedial action was taken to address hostel service concerns. Figure 4 indicates survey respondents’ overall satisfaction ratings.

Figure 4: Respondents’ overall satisfaction rating (company- and community-operated)

The survey highlighted the following results for company- and community-operated hostels:

Another important aspect of AHL business is the need to provide quality wrap-around services to clients. The survey responses provided valuable information regarding client needs, including the following:

Alyerre Hostel—Alice Springs

Allawah Grove Hostel—Perth

Some survey respondents’ comments on company-operated hostels and houses:

And comments on community-operated hostels:

Section 2

Better Lives, Better Futures—A Focus On Our Services

Rebecca Richards—the first Indigenous person to receive a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Oxford University—stayed at AHL hostels while finishing her degree

2 Better Lives, Better Futures
—a focus on our services

2.1 Enabling access to education

During 2010–11, AHL operated 13 hostels that provided accommodation for students undertaking secondary and tertiary education studies. Nine hostels were designated for secondary students and four were for tertiary students. In addition, AHL provided funding through its Community Hostel Grants Program for a further eight community-operated hostels that were primarily focused on secondary student accommodation.

The ability of rural and remote Indigenous students to access further education is a priority for AHL. Our secondary and tertiary education hostels are equipped with modern computer technology, which is a must in today’s technology-savvy society.

Secondary education houseparents need leadership, mentoring, counselling and nurturing skills to help guide and assist our young Indigenous students with their further education and development of life skills.

Our tertiary education hostel managers also need the practical knowledge and wisdom that enable our tertiary students to maintain their enthusiasm to complete their studies and to go on to achieve fulfilling careers. For many mature Indigenous students, completing a tertiary education is a life-long ambition and having a safe, secure and affordable home to return to is a very important element of focused study.

Through quality secondary education hostels, students can start to realise their dreams and begin to take a more serious step towards completing their life-journey. Rebecca Knight is one such student and her story is one of courage.

Rebecca Knight—Fusion overseas exchange recipient

For many Indigenous families, just the thought of sending one of their children to a secondary school far away from their family home is upsetting—but when a young student is imbued with sporting talent, it is a definite sign of a bigger and brighter future!

Fortunately, Dallas Green’s family allowed him to move from Moree in country New South Wales to Kirinari Secondary Education Hostel, a boys’ only facility in Newcastle.

Dallas Green—Olympics in his sights

Wangkana-Kari secondary education students participating in Royal Australian Navy activities

AHL operates four hostels that cater specifically for tertiary students. The hostels range from self-contained units to more familiar communal style accommodation, where students receive three meals a day and share common facilities, such as recreation rooms.

Durungaling Hostel is in Newcastle, a short distance from the University of Newcastle. Medical subjects are the most popular studies for the residents. The hostel provides the students with an affordable alternative to on-campus accommodation at the university.

After students have familiarised themselves with university life and the rigours of study, they usually leave the hostel for more independent living arrangements. Some students later opt to return to the hostel because they find the accommodation more affordable and the amenities comfortable. They consider that the hostel also meets their cultural needs in a collegial environment.

Durungaling Hostel—Newcastle, housing medical students

2.2 Enabling access to training and tertiary education for employment

During 2010–11, AHL operated 14 houses for people participating in the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program. The program aims to equip young Indigenous people aged between 16 and 24 with skills and knowledge that will lead to sustainable employment, and contribute to closing the gaps of disadvantage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

AHL employs qualified residential youth workers in each house to provide a holistic approach to the care of young people, at a time of major transition in their young lives. Strong bonds are formed between hostel staff and participants because the house really is their home.

The majority of house participants undertaking tertiary or vocational training graduate successfully. The following three case studies provide insights into their individual achievements.

Anna Shaw—recipient of the Apprentice of the Year Award

Being surrounded by successful individuals is only part of the attraction of the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program. Young Indigenous Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people feel optimistic and secure in this type of environment, where genuine encouragement and participation deliver positive rewards.

Flashback!

In the 2009–10 AHL annual report, readers were introduced to a number of young Indigenous defence recruits. For Joshua Cripps, Trent King and Jesse Anning their story continues.

Graduation (from left): Major General David Morrison and Joshua Cripps

Petty Officer Mark Woodhouse offering support and advice to keen recruits—Trent King and Jesse Anning

The relationship between residential youth workers and the young people they work with should not be underestimated. Besides having an innate appreciation of the trials and tribulations that our young Indigenous people endure, they also provide strong leadership and mentoring in a culturally appropriate environment. Their ability to link our young people with prospective employers for training and future employment enables us to maintain high-quality connections with the business and local community.

2.3 Enabling access to health services

During 2010–11, AHL operated six hostels which provided accommodation for residents who require access to specific medical services. They include: four hostels supporting people undergoing renal dialysis treatment, one hostel designed for mothers and babies, and one hostel designed specifically for aged Indigenous residents.

In most cases, these hostels provide post-hospital support including appropriate dietary requirements for our renal residents. Hostel managers also collaborate with other service providers, such as Mission Australia, which provides patient pick-up and drop-off services for our renal accommodation facilities. AHL relies heavily on the life experience and, social and management skills of our staff to help residents who need access to professional medical services.

For example, our renal residents are long-term accommodation users, so the hostel provides family home-style comfort rather than temporary accommodation. The long distances travelled by many residents seeking medical attention can be a concern for them. Where possible our staff encourage residents to keep in contact with their families and communities.

AHL provides funding to 22 community-operated hostels that specifically cater for residents who are involved in substance use rehabilitation programs. The hostels are an important community initiative because of the high incidence of drug and alcohol dependence among Indigenous people. The managers of community-operated hostels are very aware of residents’ needs and their aim is to support positive health outcomes for all.

The cultural environment of each community-operated hostel is an important element in the healing process for their residents. In particular, gardens and appropriate personal-space areas are necessary for each resident to cope with the demands of the substance use rehabilitation program.

During 2010–11, two hostels catered specifically for the antenatal and postnatal care of Indigenous mothers and babies. The Katherine Women’s Medical Hostel in the Northern Territory is a company-operated hostel, whereas the Mookai Rosie Bi-Bayan facility in Edmonton, Queensland is community-operated. Some new mothers are accompanied by family or friends and all visitors are made to feel welcome. In particular, young children who are also expecting a new addition to their family are helped to understand the changes that occur with the introduction of a new family member. Allowing mothers to be accompanied by their families also lessens the potential for developmental difficulties and anxiety in young children.

AHL supports a number of additional services specifically designed for mothers and babies around the time of childbirth. As well as providing accommodation and hospital transfer, these services provide links to other health, parenting skills and child development services (such as playgroups for accompanying children) that provide support through the early childhood period.

AHL hostels that provide accommodation specifically for mothers and babies are designed with a safe and healthy environment in mind.

Learning Skype at Topsy Smith Hostel—Alice Springs

Benelong’s Haven substance use rehabilitation hostel—Kempsey

Rosita Rose—Katherine Women’s Medical Hostel—awaiting the birth of her first child

Katherine Women’s Medical Hostel—Katherine

Ruth Monck, Ear Specialist, with young residents Jared Currie and Elijah Smythe at Trilby Cooper Hostel—Kalgoorlie

2.4 Assisting Indigenous people with temporary accommodation

AHL assists Indigenous people who need temporary accommodation for various reasons. Residents may be homeless, seeking access to government housing, using medical services, or visiting family and friends.

During 2010–11, AHL operated 69 hostels and houses designated for use as temporary short-term accommodation and provided funding to assist community organisations to run a further 47 hostels. These hostels are located in various rural, remote and metropolitan areas of Australia.

The occupancy level at each hostel can vary considerably depending upon the season and the reason for clients’ visits. According to the resident survey, most transitional residents were seeking access to medical services and government housing.

Sometimes the reason for requiring temporary accommodation can be very different. For two weeks in March 2011, the Kabayji Booroo Hostel in Derby was inundated with temporary residents due to massive flooding of the surrounding area. Power, water and other essential services were unavailable, and individuals and families had to seek alternative arrangements.

At the beginning of 2011, floods were also prevalent in Queensland and the Northern Territory. Although many flood-affected areas in rural, remote and metropolitan Australia were under crisis management, AHL relied on its enthusiastic hostel staff, residents and people from the local community to immediately grasp the challenge and help each other out!

AHL hostels provide a safe and secure environment for Indigenous people to stay in, while effectively meeting a number of the Council of Australian Governments’ Closing the Gap ‘building blocks’: healthy homes, safe communities and economic participation.

Families as well as individuals stay at AHL hostels. Some hostels are more family oriented than others due to their location, the amenities available, and the specific building plan of the hostel. Most residents stay at the hostel for less than one or two months. However, some families and individuals remain at the hostel longer, particularly if they are on a government housing waiting list.

A fine example of AHL staff assisting families can be seen at Mackay Hostel. The staff have a good relationship with the local Rent Connect staff. Each week, Rent Connect staff visit the hostel and talk with residents about their options and how to independently manage their finances. Our regional and hostel managers across Australia endeavour to form strong relationships with each of our stakeholders, such as Centrelink, local schools, housing organisations, and the medical profession.

AHL understands that by helping one another we can contribute to a better life and a better future for our Indigenous residents!

Kabayji Booroo Hostel—Derby

Flood affected Derby region—Western Australia— location of Kabayji Booroo Hostel

Mackay Hostel—Queensland

Occasionally, depending upon the location and need, AHL has students staying at transitional hostels. For two Arts students, Kiera Ah-See and Kenny Johnson, Musgrave Park Hostel in Brisbane provided the most appropriate accommodation.

Kenny Johnson—performing at the 2011 AHL luncheon during NAIDOC Week

Kiera Ah-See—Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts student

Good news—Yumba Hostel in Brisbane has recently entered into a memorandum of understanding with the Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts to provide 16 beds for students attending arts programs!

Kabalulumana Hostel—Mount Isa

Apmere Mwerre Visitor Park—Alice Springs

Corroboree Hostel—Katherine

Section 3

AHL operations

David Ongham and Karim Lippitt studying at the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program house—Lakes in Darwin

3 AHL operations

3.1 Performance measures

AHL is constantly looking for better ways to measure and improve on the extent to which its facilities provide safe, culturally appropriate, affordable and comfortable special purpose or temporary accommodation and tailored support services. Its prime objective is to focus on client needs. Figure 5 shows the basic elements of client accommodation needs.

Figure 5: AHL client needs

AHL goes one step further in providing quality accommodation to Indigenous Australians by value-adding to each of its services to meet clients’ needs. In particular, AHL provides regional and hostel managers with appropriate training and support services to ensure that they can and do meet the needs of clients. In this regard, AHL acts as an enabler, assisting clients towards a better life and better future.

Staff at AHL work in many different ways to enhance business activities including by:

Each year AHL aims to surpass the target requirements set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements for each program. In addition to the standard corporate governance and evaluation and review processes undertaken by AHL, the organisation works towards achieving specific Closing the Gap targets.

AHL’s provision of accommodation and associated support services is pivotal for many people being able to access the services that will close the disadvantage gap. AHL is determined to strengthen its role in this area by being an active partner with Commonwealth, state and territory governments, business and non-government organisations, and in the implementation of National Partnerships Agreements between the Australian Government and state/territory governments.

Measuring the benefit of social policy initiatives can sometimes be difficult, as much of the information is garnered through anecdotal discussions about the success or failure of a policy. However, Table 11 identifies each Closing the Gap building block outcome and also provides an accompanying AHL example of achievement.

Table 11: Closing the Gap building blocks

Building blocks

AHL participation

Early childhood

Women’s Medical Hostel in Katherine specifically caters for antenatal and postnatal care for mothers and babies. Mothers may be accompanied by their families, including their other children. Although their stay is temporary, having their children interact with others through supervised educational play aids in the growth and learning aspects of child development.

Schooling

AHL encourages all school-age children to attend a local school while they are temporarily accommodated. For example, staff at Silas Roberts Hostel in Darwin encourage parents to send their school-age children (primary and secondary) to school to build the children’s understanding, confidence, and learning abilities.

Health

AHL has hostels which provide support to residents who require renal dialysis treatment. For example, Topsy Smith Hostel in Alice Springs assists residents with their individual dietary requirements, helps residents to lead active lives through supervised exercise programs, and schedules regular bus trips to the local hospital, ensuring that important medical check-ups and treatments are completed.

Economic participation

Residents can build upon their educational knowledge and life skills, in preparation for mapping out their career path. For residents engaged in seasonal work, hostels throughout Australia provide quality short-term accommodation.

Healthy homes

The external environment of hostels and houses is as important as the internal area. Garden sanctuaries are a prominent feature of some hostels and houses, promoting comfort and pride in the surroundings. The healthy atmosphere created (internally and externally) by caring staff enhances our residents’ experience.

Safe communities

Hostel and house staff develop and maintain an appropriate level of safety for each of our resident communities. Being respectful and acknowledging the value of one anothers’ contributions to the hostel and house environment is an important element of our residents’ stay.

Governance and leadership

AHL seeks to engage key community stakeholders that can connect it to the governance and support required when determining the feasibility of a facility. This is a fundamental premise on which AHL evaluates the extent to which a facility contributes to Closing the Gap outcomes.

‘Staying the course’ to facilitate and enable Indigenous Australians to achieve their best is of paramount concern to staff. In addition, residents can influence each other. Whether residents and staff are providing general support to one another or staff are providing specific information about government housing, educational opportunities or health advice, staff and residents consistently try to help one another.

For example, residents who have successfully completed their secondary and tertiary studies sometimes return to their hostel or house to share their experiences with new residents. This type of interaction and follow-up is typical of our staff and residents wanting the best for Indigenous Australians.

AHL appreciates feedback as it enables the company to better service the needs of clients. Moreover, new business developments can be driven in a positive way. Figure 6 shows how AHL goes about changing the every-day lives and futures of our Indigenous residents.

Figure 6: AHL—enabling Better Lives, Better Futures...

Evaluation and reviews

Throughout 2010–11, staff completed specific hostel evaluations and carried out comprehensive reviews of current business processes. In particular, a review of the Kevin Coombs Hostel in Melbourne revealed that demand was low and that accommodation alternatives provided by AHL and others could meet this small demand.

In evaluating its hostels, AHL applies ‘fit for purpose’ criteria which enable the company to identify whether a specific hostel is operating at an optimal level. If not, alternatives may be considered, such as:

During 2010–11, AHL introduced a new quality assurance framework which effectively provides a formalised program of regular visits and assessments of quality from the perspective of residents. By obtaining this information, management and staff can address any anomalies in customer service and improve overall hostel operations and performance across the country.

3.2 Collaboration

Government initiatives

Through effective partnerships with other Australian Government agencies AHL contributes wholeheartedly to joint initiatives. For example, on 31 May 2011, AHL celebrated World No Tobacco Day by tackling Indigenous smoking through the launch of a comprehensive health campaign.

Information packs and access to ‘quit smoking’ products are just some of the ways AHL has assisted and supported residents (and staff) to give up smoking. Inter-government collaborations also provide assurance to the general public that AHL is not alone in wanting the best of health, education, housing and socioeconomic advantage for all.

Ministers and AHL staff launching the World No Tobacco Day ‘National Tobacco Campaign 2011’

Stakeholder management and partnerships

AHL’s extensive experience in providing temporary accommodation for Indigenous Australians has led to its recognition as a much sought-after partner in the provision of hostel accommodation. It continues to provide valuable assistance and consult with stakeholders on the construction and operation of temporary accommodation where the market is unable to respond.

AHL’s proactive response to addressing market failure has resulted in inter-government partnerships with national, state and territory departments, such as the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, the Northern Territory Department of Health and Families, and the Northern Territory Department of Construction and Infrastructure.  

AHL is providing departments and agencies with broad-ranging assistance, including:

In February 2011, Apmere Mwerre Visitor Park in Alice Springs was opened by Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, the Hon. Jenny Macklin MP, Chief Minister of the Northern Territory Mr Paul Henderson MLA and Minister for Central Australia, Mr Karl Hampton MLA.

The park, which has proven to be very popular, is a joint Australian and Northern Territory government initiative that provides short-term accommodation for 150 residents. Having cabins, tents and more communal-style accommodation available—a new business model for AHL—has also had a positive impact on the local community.

Ministers Hampton and Macklin at the official opening of Apmere Mwerre Visitor Park—even the weather could not dampen the spirit of the occasion

During 2010–11, contractors commenced work on the $13 million Wadeye Boarding Facility in the Northern Territory. The facility is being constructed by AHL for the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. This secondary education facility is envisaged to be operating in 2012, catering for up to 40 student residents. Remote students will come from a large part of the Northern Territory.

Construction commenced on two other hostel projects in 2010–11: Port Hedland Renal Hostel and the Indigenous Mothers Accommodation Facility in Darwin. Both hostels are earmarked for completion during 2011–12. Each hostel will provide access to health services (renal dialysis, and antenatal and postnatal care), and both are positioned near local hospital centres. AHL will operate both facilities on behalf of the Northern Territory Government.

Other governments and private sector companies are working with AHL to create more opportunities for Indigenous Australians to enhance their lives, through education, training and life-skills development. AHL works with educational organisations (many of which have Indigenous liaison officers) at secondary and tertiary establishments to help residents complete their studies and plan appropriate career paths.

AHL also works closely with governments to enable AHL residents to be involved in any new social inclusion initiatives which become available. For example, during 2010–11 the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing launched its Closing the Gap: Tackling Indigenous Chronic Disease Package. In particular, the campaign highlighted diabetes awareness. AHL has four hostels which specifically cater for renal dialysis residents, where the focus is on maintaining a healthy lifestyle and promoting a healthy future. This is yet another example of AHL positively influencing our residents.

AHL’s stakeholder relationship management strategy is assisting new business stakeholders to identify government programs and funding suitable for their projects, and opening the doors to enable them to make contact and put forward proposals for funding. 

Construction of the Wadeye Student Boarding Facility—laying the foundations June 2011

Construction of the Indigenous Mothers Accommodation Facility in Darwin—laying the foundations June 2011

Tenders, submissions and market failure

AHL is recognised as being the largest and most capable organisation in its area of business and is often the first approached when needs must be met. AHL believes that its correct place as a government-owned entity is as a provider of services where there is market failure. AHL has the view that those non-government organisations that are willing and able to provide such services should be allowed to do so. AHL does not seek to compete with or supplant any other prospective provider of appropriate accommodation or related services.

Where AHL has been invited to operate a new facility, its long experience in operations and construction and its strong relationships with government, service providers and communities are recognised as a valuable contribution in ensuring optimal outcomes.

Construction of the Port Hedland Renal Hostel—June 2011

In April 2011, Kabalulumana Hostel—Mount Isa received a Master Builders Housing and Construction Award for Sporting and Community Service Facilities $4 Million to $15 Million Category

3.3 Our people

Staffing profile

AHL employs a workforce dedicated to delivering hostel services and contributing to the Council of Australian Governments’ Closing the Gap policy agenda. At 30 June 2010, AHL employed 559 staff (355 ongoing and 204 non-ongoing employees), which equated to a full-time equivalent staff of 475. A breakdown is shown in Table12.

Table 12: Staff profile, 2010–11, by APS level

APS level

Total staff

Female

Male

Full-time

Part-time

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Indigenous

Non-Indigenous

Agency head

1

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

1

SES 1

3

0

3

3

0

3

0

1

2

EXEC 2

5

2

3

5

0

5

0

2

3

EXEC 1

15

9

6

14

1

15

0

11

4

APS 6

25

17

8

24

1

15

10

14

11

APS 5

21

14

7

20

1

20

1

16

5

APS 4

41

33

8

10

31

9

32

30

11

APS 3

88

56

32

78

10

76

12

79

9

APS 2

64

43

21

33

31

39

25

51

13

APS 1

296

195

101

133

163

172

124

227

69

Totals

559

369

190

321

238

355

204

431

128

% of
total staff

100%

66%

34%

57%

43%

64%

36%

77%

23%

Workplace diversity profile

AHL works hard to maintain and encourage diversity in the workplace, which is one of our greatest strengths. AHL has a pleasing Indigenous employment record, averaging nearly 82 per cent over the past five years. However, in 2010–11 the proportion of Indigenous employees did not reach the target of 80 per cent. This was largely due to competition for Indigenous employees in many parts of Australia and to the limited numbers of qualified Indigenous applicants for specialist positions.

Table 13 provides further information on diversity.

Table 13: Diversity of AHL employees

Diversity of employees

% of AHL employees

Indigenous

77 

Women

66 

Aged 46 years and over

50 

Under 25 years of age

From non-English speaking background

10 

Have a disability

Recruitment and retention

AHL’s key recruitment and retention challenge is to create an environment that will attract, develop and retain a skilled workforce now and into the future, and meeting that challenge requires AHL to be innovative. Improving staff retention rates was a focus in 2010–11, while attraction factors varied by location and work characteristics.

AHL is working in partnership with the Australian Public Service Commission and other Australian Government agencies to improve the recruitment of Indigenous entry-level trainees. AHL’s contribution will include participation in the assessment centre process, through which the company is seeking to recruit five trainees.

Attendance

In 2010–11, there was a total of 13.2 days of unscheduled leave per full-time equivalent employee. This included an average of 11.7 days of sick/carers leave, 0.8 days of miscellaneous leave and 0.7 days of workers compensation per full-time equivalent employee. The median Australian Public Service absence rate in 2009–10 was 10.5 days per employee per year. While a certain level of employee absence is unavoidable, AHL continues to closely monitor and analyse workplace absences to identify and address potential problems.

Table 14 shows recruitment, separation and turnover statistics for the five years to 2010–11.

Table 14: Recruitment, separation and turnover, 2006–07 to 2010–11

APS level

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

Positions advertised

258

213

224

221

267

Promotions

21

15

14

9

20

Applications for review of promotion

0

0

0

0

0

Assignments at level

8

8

21

3

25

Retirement termination

10

5

12

27

22

Ongoing engagements

130

120

131

139

106

Ongoing separations

118

103

125

129

117

Staff turnover (%)a

24.2

20.2

23.3

24.9

23.5

Recruitment advertising ($)

210,000

169,618

196,366

350,609

289,163

a Excludes staff who separated from AHL due to end of contract or redundancy.

Leadership: valuing and developing staff

AHL offers opportunities to help its staff develop, improve, overcome challenges, balance work and life, and lead within the company through a wide range of internal and external development programs.

Each year, selected staff receive specific awards for their personal commitment, excellence in management, client service, innovation, initiative, outstanding contribution or corporate citizenship. In 2010–11, AHL Australia Day Awards Medallions for Achievement were given to:

Brian Gibbs

Western Australia

Lennie Satour

Northern Territory

Tracey Leo Warcon

Northern Territory

Marlene Mitchell

Northern Queensland

Gloria Mairu

Southern Queensland

Elizabeth Simpson

New South Wales

LaToya Hall

Central Office

Elizabeth Donaldson

South Australia

Michele Hill

South Australia

AHL also provides additional recognition to employees who have remained with the company for a period of 10 years or longer. In 2010–11, the following staff members were recognised for their years of service:

10 years service

  • Marciel Taylor
  • Eddie Mosby
  • Ivan Popow
  • Allan Shibasaki
  • Gloria Mairu

15 years service

  • Shirley Furber
  • Bernadette Lioni

20 years service

  • Aaron Perkins-Kemp-Berger

Performance pay

A performance bonus may be awarded to hostel managers who have contributed significantly to the delivery of high-quality service and management. During the 2010–11 financial year, 21 hostel managers received a bonus.

Performance pay is available to substantive senior executive staff and may take the form of an annual bonus, bonus payment during the cycle or movement to a higher salary. Such payments recognise outstanding contributions to particular work outcomes.

AHL staff at the Strategic Planning Day—February 2011

Staff training and development

AHL continued to offer training programs to address organisational and individual capability needs. AHL benefits by having expertise in areas critical to its future strategic and business priorities. Training programs are driven largely by individual development needs and identified through performance conversations. Training may be conducted in-house or provided externally and is delivered at national or regional office locations.

Expenditure on training during 2010–11 was $243,474. During the year, a total of 966 training attendances were recorded. The average number of training hours per person was 13.1.

With the introduction of AHL’s new reservation management system, customised IT training was provided to all hostel managers and designated Central Office staff.

A number of regional staff members were invited to be ‘IT champions’, and after their training was complete they were able to teach others about the new reservation system. IT training was held at various locations across Australia, and even our senior executives were involved in the process!

A range of accredited training programs were conducted during 2010–11. For example, four people participated in the Productivity Placement Program. Of the four, two are undertaking a Certificate IV and the other two are studying for a diploma. Subjects include project management and human resource management.

In 2010–11, as in previous years, staff members attended technical and professional conferences on education, welfare, Indigenous health and Comcare and the National Association for Rural Student Accommodation conference. Staff also attended Indigenous Australian Public Service Employees Network meetings nationwide, and the APS Indigenous Employees Conference.

AHL’s Studybank Scheme is a mechanism for encouraging staff to take responsibility for their own development and to seek opportunities to further develop their knowledge, skills and competencies. During 2010–11, four staff were approved for Studybank.

Performance management

Performance management and individual development plans were progressively completed during the year. The focus is now on promoting effective communication and employee engagement and establishing a culture of ongoing and constructive feedback, both formal and informal.

Learning together—AHL staff teaching others the new reservation management system (from left): Ryan Selway, Roger Barson, Kristy Darcy, and Tony Hunt

Workplace relations

AHL has two enterprise agreements that cover all non-Senior Executive Service (SES) employees.  Although both agreements nominally expired on 30 June 2011, they remain in operation until replaced by a new agreement. Bargaining for the proposed agreement commenced in July 2011.

Staff survey

The most recent staff survey was carried out in 2008. The necessary pre-planning and preparation for a new survey commenced in June 2011, and the survey is scheduled for completion in August 2011. The results should appear in the 2011–12 annual report.

Occupational health and safety

Under the Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991 and the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988, AHL is committed to providing a safe and healthy workplace. The maintenance of high standards of health, safety and welfare for everyone associated with our activities and the provision of support to all employees who sustain a work-related illness or injury are priorities at AHL. Staff demonstrate and enact the occupational health and safety (OH&S)policy: the importance of health and safety are essential elements of wellbeing.

Health and safety management arrangements—Comcare

During 2009–10, AHL was served with an enforceable undertaking by Comcare, citing clause 2 of Schedule 2 of the Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991. AHL has responded positively to the undertaking by greatly improving the organisation’s strategic approach to OH&S by conducting a wholesale review of AHL’s OH&S procedures and systems.

As of 4 May 2011, the undertaking was no longer in force.

Health and safety initiatives

Actions in 2010–11 to ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of employees, hostel residents and visitors included:

Elizabeth Nawirridj enjoying the garden at Daisy Yarmirr Hostel—Darwin

Health and safety OUTCOMES

AHL’s workers compensation premium for 2010–11 was 3.62 per cent of the annual payroll, an increase from 3.56 per cent in 2009–10. This reflects the upward trend in the number and cost of claims for injuries suffered in 2010 and earlier.

AHL’s OH&S program is supported by regional and national OH&S, management, and elected health and safety representatives. The regional committees consist of representatives from all operational areas.

Each region has a target of three meetings in each financial year. Overall compliance with the target in 2010–11 was 82 per cent, a 0.5 per cent reduction from the previous year.

Employee Assistance Program

Our Employee Assistance Program is designed to help employees meet the challenges of their work and personal lives by providing individual counselling, critical incident debriefing services, and management coaching.

Table 15 shows Employee Assistance Program consultations for the five years to 2010–11. Consultations in 2010–11 involved 2.5 per cent of AHL staff, a 0.25 per cent decrease from 2009–10.

AHL’s assistance program utilisation is lower than the average for similarly sized public sector organisations (5.12%). The usage indicates a need to develop a strategy to promote the program and to emphasise its services to managers, including the managers’ hotline.

Table 15: Employee Assistance Program consultations, 2006-07 to 2010-11

 

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

Number of consultations

9

16

20

15

14

Incident reporting

Incident reports must be completed for any event considered to involve the risk or occurrence of loss, damage or injury. During 2010–11, there were 141 reported incidents. Of those, 66 per cent involved injury, highlighting the increased awareness of the need to report near misses.

Incidents notified to Comcare under section 68 of the Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991 are outlined in Table 16.

Table 16: Notifiable incidents, 2010–11

Notifiable incidents

2010–11

Deaths

Dangerous occurrence

Serious personal injury

There were 6 reported incidents which involved on-site medical emergency action in the workplace. Each incident was promptly attended to and appropriate follow-up action was taken.

NSW regional office staff (from left): Hayley Bowman, Petah Adams, and Kim Naden

3.4 Internal audit

In 2010–11, Internal Audit reviewed 11 of the company-operated hostels and two of AHL’s eight regional offices. The regional offices and hostels reviewed were operating satisfactorily. Issues identified in the reviews were referred to regional management for appropriate remedial action.

For nine months of the 2010–11 financial year, two senior internal audit staff were assigned to other operational areas within the company. Also during this period, the Annual Plan, the Three Year Strategic Audit Plan, the Internal Audit Manual and the Fraud Control Plan were revised with assistance from an external consultant.

Staff of the Australian National Audit Office visited AHL’s Central Office during May 2011 as part of its 2010–11 financial statement audits.

The following key AHL documents were revised during 2010–11 to reflect the Australian Government’s Fraud Control Guidelines:

The documents will be submitted to the Audit and Risk Management Committee for approval and subsequent implementation during the 2011–12 financial year. The company maintains highly effective fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting procedures and processes. Annual fraud data has been collected and reported in accordance with company guidelines and the Fraud Control Guidelines.

The Chief Executive Officer, the board of directors and the Audit and Risk Management Committee are satisfied that AHL has appropriate fraud control mechanisms in place and that those mechanisms comply with the Fraud Control Guidelines. The AHL Fraud Awareness Guide is widely distributed to existing and new AHL staff, and to all contractors engaged by AHL. The guide is a quick reference to fraud control, fraud control policy, reporting responsibilities and the code of conduct, and includes contact details for the reporting of fraud or suspicion of fraudulent activity within the company.

In 2010–11, Internal Audit provided fraud awareness training to staff at Central Office and the two regional offices visited. The review of suspected and proven fraud against AHL is an ongoing priority.

During 2010–11, three investigations involving a total of $2,915 were undertaken or coordinated by Internal Audit. Of the total amount, $60 was recovered; $2,855 was attributable to invoice ‘scams’, but no moneys were released or paid.

Section 4

Corporate governance

Joyce Williams, Hostel Manager, Katherine Women’s Medical Hostel, and Samantha Peckham, health worker with Katherine Sunrise Health Services

4 Corporate governance

Aboriginal Hostels Limited

ABN 47 008 504 587

4.1 Corporate governance statement

Unless otherwise disclosed below, the company has followed the best practice guide on corporate governance principles, as published by the Australian National Audit Office, for the entire financial year ended 30 June 2011.

Board composition

The skills, experience and expertise relevant to the position of each director who is in office at the date of the annual report and their term of office are detailed in the Directors’ Report.

AHL directors are appointed by the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. All directors are non-executive.

The names of the non-executive directors in office during the financial year and until the date of this report are:

Directors have the right to seek independent professional advice at the company’s expense in furtherance of their duties. Written approval must be obtained from the Chairperson prior to incurring any expense on behalf of the company.

Ethical standards

The Board acknowledges and emphasises the importance of all directors and employees maintaining the highest standards of corporate governance practice and ethical conduct.

The company has adopted the Australian Public Service Values and Code of Conduct, which apply to all directors and employees. The Values and Code of Conduct provide a framework for ethical behaviour, actions and decision-making within the company. They enable consistent standards and approaches to be adopted in all the company’s dealings with customers, stakeholders and employees.

The Values and Code of Conduct are communicated initially to all new directors and staff through the induction process and are also incorporated in in-house training programs. Staff are briefed through internal staff notes when there are significant updates.

Directors are obliged to be independent in judgement and to take all reasonable steps to ensure that due care is taken by the Board in making sound decisions.

Board training

Most directors undertook the comprehensive Company Directors Course Diploma in Canberra from 2 to 6 May 2011. The course was delivered by the Australian Institute of Company Directors and was part of the induction program for new directors and refresher course for others. As part of the course, modules on the role and responsibilities of directors were delivered up front for those members of the Board who could not attend the entire week-long program.

Audit and Risk Management Committee

During the financial year, the Audit Committee was renamed the Audit and Risk Management Committee. The committee’s charter was revised to reflect its new responsibilities.

The names and qualifications of those appointed to the Audit and Risk Management Committee and their attendance at meetings of the committee are included in the Directors’ Report.

The role, objectives, duties and responsibilities of the committee are documented in its charter, which is reviewed annually. Membership is for a maximum period of three years.

The committee is responsible for dealing with such matters as:

The internal and external auditors submit audit plans, progress reports and final reports to the committee. As part of good governance practice, at each meeting, the committee meets without management being present. It also meets separately with internal auditors and external auditors.

During the financial year, the two independent members of the committee were:

Mr Geoff Knuckey–Chartered accountant and retired managing partner of Ernst & Young, Canberra

Mr Emil Kovacik–General Manager of Hotels, The Doma Group, Canberra.

Audit and Risk Management Committee training

The committee had one day of comprehensive training on the role and responsibilities of the members, along with an opportunity to review the charter and evaluation questionnaire. The training was delivered in Canberra on 20 November 2010 by the Australian Institute of Company Directors and was part of the induction program for new members and refresher course for others.

Performance evaluation

The AHL Board adopted a revised evaluation questionnaire for directors that covers areas
such as:

The performance evaluation of the Board is conducted at the August meeting of directors each year. The evaluation questionnaire provides the mechanism for confidential feedback to the Chairperson of the Board.

The Chairperson also talks to each director on a needs basis regarding their role as a director. The results from the questionnaire are collated and discussed by the Chairperson at a subsequent full Board meeting. Appropriate action is taken to remedy any identified shortcomings in order to further enhance the performance of the Board. The Chairperson has the ability to use an external consultant to analyse the responses and to assist with any issues that may require attention.

The AHL Audit and Risk Management Committee also revised its performance questionnaire. The evaluation of the committee is conducted at the August meeting each year. The questionnaire also provides the mechanism for confidential feedback to the Chairperson of the committee.

The revised evaluation questionnaire for the committee covers areas such as:

The Chairperson of the committee also talks to each member as needed regarding their role. The results from the questionnaire are collated and discussed at a subsequent full committee meeting. Appropriate action is taken to remedy identified shortcomings to further enhance the performance of the committee. The Chairperson has the ability to use an external consultant to analyse the responses and to assist with any issues that may require attention.

Board Charter

The AHL Board Charter describes the roles and responsibilities of directors and management. It brings together all the relevant documents and legislative requirements into a single document. The Board Charter was revised during 2010–11 to keep it updated with changes in the legislative framework and the company’s strategic documents including policies and procedures.

Constitution

During the financial year, the Board recommended several amendments to the company’s constitution for approval by the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, who represents the sole member, the Australian Government. The changes include best practice clauses and include changes such as renaming the General Manager ‘Chief Executive Officer’. The changes to the constitution were approved by the Minister on 19 July 2011 and lodged with the Australian Securities and Investment Commission on 1 August 2011.

Annual report award

AHL won a gold award in the Australasian Reporting Awards on 8 June 2011 for its 2009–10 annual report. Company director Mr Hugo Johnston accepted the award on AHL’s behalf.

Hugo Johnston accepting the ARA Gold Award on behalf of AHL

Risk management

Regular management and Board reviews identify strategic risks in the company’s activities. The AHL Board meets five times a year partly to ensure that risk management remains a significant focus at the strategic level. Contact with other government agencies helps to maintain an up-to-date view of relevant government policies on risk management.

The company undertook a comprehensive review of its Strategic Risk Management Plan involving directors, Audit and Risk Management Committee members and senior management during 2010–11. The revised plan was endorsed by the Board on 15 June 2011. As a further step, the company also integrated the Strategic Risk Management Plan into the Internal Audit Strategic Plan and the Fraud Control Plan.

The company’s Risk Management Plan has been designed to be embedded in all parts of the decision-making process. Operations plans derived from the Risk Management Plan were further developed in 2010–11 to include integration with other planning processes, updating of relevant documentation and the introduction of risk management training.

Business Continuity Plan

An integral part of the company’s risk management is the Business Continuity Plan. The focus of the plan is to restore normal business processes within specific timeframes following a significant disruption to the company’s activities.

In order to restore normal business activities following a significant disruption, the plan allocates priorities and timeframes for the implementation of procedures that minimise the effects of the disruption. The Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) assisted with the development and coordination of various aspects of the plan.

A significant development during the year was the implementation of real-time server backup at the TransACT data centre in Canberra. In addition the company continued with the offsite storage of data backup tapes with Recall.

Stakeholder Management Strategy

In 2010–11, the directors agreed to the implementation of the AHL’s Stakeholder Management Strategy to promote an awareness of the company’s services and capabilities to clients, customers and service providers. A major element of the strategy was the creation of an executive position for business development, which occurred in November 2010.

Information Security Policy

The company’s Information Security Policy was implemented progressively during 2010–11 following the rollout of an updated IT network. The policy complies with industry best practice and includes a more secure environment for desktops, more robust passwords, a mandatory introduction to computer security processes for new users and improved IT management information reporting.

The Security Policy was also reviewed and updated as part of a post-implementation audit of the newly designed data network by Moore Stephens Consultants.

Remuneration policies

The Remuneration Tribunal approves the company’s terms and conditions of remuneration relating to the appointment and retirement of the Board members and of the Chief Executive Officer.

The remuneration and terms of conditions of employment for senior executives and other staff of AHL are in accordance with the Public Service Act 1999, the AHL Enterprise Agreements 2009–2011 and common law contracts.

Statement of Intent

On 22 July 2010, the company finalised its Statement of Intent in response to the Minister’s Statement of Expectations of 24 May 2010. The Minister issued a revised Statement of Expectations on 2 December 2010 but indicated that no changes to the company’s Statement of Intent of 22 July 2010 were required, as it already covered the identified areas of priorities and revised strategic objectives.

Ernst & Young review

Ernst & Young conducted a review of AHL in 2008 and in June 2009 was appointed to assist the company to implement the report’s recommendations. This work was completed during 2010–11.

Other information

AHL’s website (www.ahl.gov.au) provides further information about the company’s governance, structure and policies.

4.2 Directors’ Report

The directors present their report on the company in this section together with the financial statements for the financial year ended 30 June 2011.

Principal activities

The principal activity of the company during 2010–11 was the operation of hostels for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The objective of the company is to provide or facilitate safe, culturally appropriate and affordable accommodation for Indigenous Australians who must live away from home to access services and economic opportunity.

To help achieve the aims of the company, the Australian Government makes funds available to the company, subject to agreed terms and conditions. Those funds are appropriated by the Australian Parliament for the company’s capital and recurrent expenditure programs. AHL also enters into contracts with other parties to operate hostel facilities on a fee-for-service basis.

During the financial year the AHL Board decided that it would no longer be involved in the aged care category of accommodation due to the specialised nature of the industry. As a result, the development of the Noongar Elders Home in Kenwick, Western Australia, ceased.

Similarly, tenders were called for the outsourcing/transfer of the Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged in Alice Springs. Negotiations are currently underway with the preferred tenderer for the transfer of the facility, which is likely to be finalised by December 2011.

Apart from these, there was no significant change in the nature of the company’s activities during the year.

Operating results

The operating profit of $3,510,723 was transferred to retained profits. The profit mainly relates to grant funding from the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) for the construction of the Wadeye Student Boarding Facility ($12.116 million or $8 .9 million after project costs were incurred) and from FaHCSIA for the construction of the Indigenous Mothers Accommodation Facility in Darwin ($1.171 million or $0.4 million after project costs were incurred). Both these projects are planned for completion during the 2011–12 financial year.

If the DEEWR and FaHCSIA projects are disregarded from the operating result, the revised result is a loss of $5,761,812. The loss is due to the completion of all previous year’s major maintenance of $3.747 million (this funding was provided in 2008–09, 2009–10 and 2010–11 Budgets); special expenditure of $1.215 million on the Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged; and expenditure of $0. 8 million associated with the development of the Noongar Elders Home, Kenwick, Western Australia.

Review of operations

This section reports on a review of the operations of the company during the financial year and the results of those operations.

Performance indicators

The Board and management monitor the company’s overall performance, from its implementation of the vision statement and strategic plan through to its performance against operating plans, financial budgets and service level agreements.

The company finalised and adopted the best practice Performance Management Framework during the financial year (with the assistance of Ernst & Young).

Financial position

The net assets of the company increased by $10,431,000 from 27 June 2010 to $104,481,000 in 2011 ($94,050,000 in 2009–10). This was mainly due to the work in progress for the Port Hedland Renal Hostel, and committed but unspent cash for the Wadeye Student Boarding Facility (funding from DEEWR) and the Indigenous Mothers Accommodation Facility in Darwin (funding from FaHCSIA).

Cash on hand and at bank

Total cash available at 30 June 2011 was $29.0 million ($22.3 million at 26 June 2010). The total cash amount represents commitments as listed in Table 17.

Table 17: Cash on hand and at bank

Commitment

Cash on hand ($ million)

Capital and major maintenance

23.8

Community Hostel Grants Program

0.6

Current liabilities

 

Annual leave

1.5

Long service leave

1.1

Accrued salaries

0.7

Trade and other creditors

1.3

Total

29.0

Capital and major maintenance funds: $23.8 million

The capital and major maintenance funds include committed funds for major development and maintenance works in progress at 30 June 2011.

This includes $17.5 million in development works as follows:

The remaining $6.3 million includes various major maintenance works and occupational health and safety (OH&S) works in progress at AHL hostels that will be completed during 2011–12.

Community Hostel Grants funds: $0.6 million

This includes $600,000 in committed but unspent funds for the hostel grants and minor capital that will be carried over into the 2011–12 financial year.

Annual leave liability: $1.5 million

This represents the current liability for the annual leave provision for all AHL employees at 30 June 2011.

Long service leave liability: $1.1 million

This represents the current liability for the long service leave provision for eligible employees at 30 June 2011.

Accrued salaries liability: $0.7 million

This includes the current liability for staff salaries for the period from 23 June 2011 to 30 June 2011, payment of which was made in Pay 1 for 2011–12 on 6 July 2011.

Trade and other creditors: $1.3 million

The trade and other creditors’ current liability at 30 June 2011 totals $1.3 million.

Property, plant and equipment

During the year, the company increased its investment in property, plant and equipment (at net book value) by $1,770,000 ($12,542,000 increase in 2009–10).

Provision for depreciation

An amount of $4,034,000 was provided for depreciation during 2010–11 ($2,218,000 in 2009–10). On 30 June 2011, the company had a credit balance in its provision for depreciation of $29,165,000 ($25,350,000 in 2009–10), which is considered adequate for the needs of the company.

Community Hostel Grants

The company makes grants to community organisations to assist them operate their own hostels and purchase or replace minor assets. In addition, certain properties owned by the company have been leased to community groups to operate as hostels.

Related party disclosures

There are no related party disclosure transactions for 2010–11.

Significant changes in state of affairs

During the financial year, the company consolidated the operations of its regional offices in Cairns and Brisbane. Queensland operations are now being managed from Brisbane with the assistance of the Deputy Regional Manager based in the Cairns office.

Supervision of the South Australian operations of the company was shifted from Melbourne Regional Office to Alice Springs Regional Office. Similarly, responsibility for the Kununurra Secondary Education Hostel was shifted from Perth Regional Office to Darwin Regional Office.

After balance date events

No matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of AHL, the results of those operations, or the state of affairs of the company in subsequent financial years.

Future developments

The company is not aware of any event that is likely to lead to developments in operations in future years.

Environmental issues

The company’s operations are subject to environmental regulations by all tiers of government. Those regulations were all adhered to during 2010–11.

Environmental sustainability

The company’s Environmental Management System is integrated into its construction and maintenance practices and is based on the requirements in AS/NZS 14001:1996. The system is the mechanism for implementing the company’s policy for ensuring the environmental sustainability of its activities.

The Environmental Management System helps the company to focus on sustainable processes in the areas of:

Implementation of the environmental sustainability policy is included in the company’s Construction Standards Manual.

Examples of policy implementation include a commitment to four-cylinder company cars and the installation of solar hot water units and solar electricity panels at a number of existing hostel sites. Solar hot water units and solar electricity panels are included in the design of new hostels with a view to not only lessen the environmental impact but also minimise usage costs.

Occupational health and safety issues

The company continues to meet OH&S requirements at all its sites through regular inspections and meetings by its OH&S representatives. Issues of concern are raised through the representatives at each work site and attended to promptly by the company. The company invests around $2.1 million annually in maintaining its buildings. Each AHL hostel site has fully trained and accredited first aid officers to provide 24-hour coverage.

The OH&S Committee is made up of nine regional subcommittees and one national committee. The company has a full-time National Occupational Health and Safety Officer based in Canberra to oversee and monitor the OH&S policy and procedures within AHL.

Comcare Australia is responsible for the company’s OH&S insurance scheme. Insurance premiums are levied each year based on the level of salaries and wages costs and the experience of claims made by the company employees. Comcare also assesses compliance with the Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991, associated regulations and approved codes of practice.

Comcare enforceable undertaking

As a result of a goods lift incident at the Iris Clay Hostel in Townsville, the company entered into an enforceable undertaking with Comcare Australia. All undertakings have been fully implemented and the enforceable undertaking was formally concluded on 4 May 2011.

Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged—Alice Springs

AHL has operated Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged for over 25 years and successfully assisted many elderly Indigenous people in that region. It has been increasingly challenged by the requirements and difficulties of operating a high-care nursing home for Indigenous Australians in remote locations within the standards required and the funds provided by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. Most industry operators advise that the viability of nursing homes requires an economy of scale for managing a chain of such facilities, along with the ability to derive income from aged care hostels (with entry contributions) and/or retirement villages.

In November 2010, AHL invited major providers of aged care in regional and remote Australia to submit proposals to take responsibility for the Hetti Perkins Home. While negotiations were underway with the Uniting Church (Frontier Services), the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency determined that the Home did not meet required standards. AHL entered into a management agreement with Frontier Services to manage the Hetti Perkins Home and to assist with the rectification of all risks highlighted by the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency.

A subsequent visit by the agency on 15 July 2011 found 100 per cent compliance with the required accreditation standards. Negotiations have recommenced with Frontier Services for the full transfer and operation of the Hetti Perkins Home and this will be finalised during 2011–12.

Fire safety and monitoring

The company has adopted best practice compliance with fire safety and fire equipment maintenance requirements as required under the Building Code of Australia and as adopted by the state of Queensland.

During 2010–11, to facilitate best practice compliance and monitoring, the company engaged National Fire Solutions for the ongoing maintenance and servicing of fire equipment on site, and Trimevac for staff training and fire evacuation plans. The company intends to move to a state based fire maintenance contractor during 2011–12 for more efficient and timely service at all facilities.

Accounting system

A new accounting system—Dynamics Great Plains, a Microsoft product—was implemented from 1 July 2010. Dynamics Great Plains improved the efficiency and effectiveness of the company’s financial accounting, reporting and analysis functions.

Reservation management system

During the financial year, a new reservation management system was installed progressively in a phased rollout program to replace manual systems for recording resident information and the collection of tariff income. Training in the new system was conducted for staff throughout Australia and an in-house support structure was created to assist hostel staff. The system provides input to the company’s new Dynamics Great Plains accounting system to enable more timely and detailed management reporting.

Centralisation of payments

In an ongoing program for improved efficiencies, the company centralised payments of all accounts. Part of the implementation included the closure of hostel bank accounts and the opening of a number of accounts with national suppliers such as Coles and Woolworths. The company will continue to establish ongoing accounts with suppliers where possible.

AHL Divisional Managers (from left): John Higgins, Dr Paul Kauffman, Vrishral Raj
Inset (from top): Anne Martin and Margaret Moore

4.3 Information on directors

Company Secretary

Dr Kamlesh Sharma held the position of Company Secretary at the end of the financial year. Dr Sharma is a barrister and solicitor of the ACT Supreme Court and the High Court of Australia. He is a member of the ACT Law Society, the NSW Law Society and CPA Australia and a fellow of Chartered Secretaries Australia, the Australian Institute of Company Directors and the Institute of Public Accountants.

Directors’ meetings

During the financial year, five Board meetings of the directors and five Audit and Risk Management Committee meetings of the directors were held. The number of meetings attended by each director during the year is shown in Table 18.

Table 18: Attendance at Board and Audit and Risk Management Committee meetings, 2010–11

Name

Board meetings

Audit and Risk Management Committee meetings

 

Number eligible to attend

Number attended

Number eligible to attend

Number attended

Mr Kevin Smith

5

5

Mr Hugo Johnston

5

5

3

3

Mr Pat Watson

5

4

5

5

Mr Wayne Jackson PSM

5

5

Ms Kerrynne Liddlea

3

2

Ms Vanessa Elliott

3

3

Mrs Elaine McKeon AOb

4

3

5

3

Mrs Helen McLaughlinb

1

a Ms Liddle was unable to attend the June 2011 meeting in Darwin due to the closure of Adelaide Airport.

b Mrs Elaine McKeon, AO and Mrs Helen McLaughlin retired from the AHL Board during the 2010–11 financial year.

Indemnifying officers or auditor

During or since the end of the financial year, the company has not indemnified or entered into an agreement to indemnify, or paid or agreed to pay, any insurance premiums.

During the financial year, the company paid premiums to insure each of the directors and officers against liabilities for costs and expenses incurred by them in defending any legal proceedings arising out of their conduct while acting in the capacity of director or officer of the company, other than conduct involving a wilful breach of duty in relation to the company. The company also arranged personal accident and travel insurance for directors for travel on official company business.

The total insurance premium for the directors was $10,302 ($10,245 in 2009–10).

Proceedings on behalf of company

No person has applied for leave of a court to bring proceedings on behalf of the company or intervene in any proceedings to which the company is a party for the purpose of taking responsibility on behalf of the company for all or any part of those proceedings.

The company was not a party to any such proceedings during the year.

Auditor’s independence declaration

The auditor’s independence declaration for the year ended 30 June 2011 has been received and can be found immediately after this report.

Rounding of amounts

The company is an entity to which ASIC Class Order 98/100 applies, and accordingly amounts in the financial statements and the Directors’ Report have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars.

4.4 Remuneration report

This report details the nature and amount of remuneration for each director of the company and for the executives.

Remuneration policy

The Remuneration Tribunal determines the remuneration policy of the company relating to the directors and the Chief Executive Officer. The tribunal approves the company’s terms and conditions of remuneration relating to the appointment and retirement of the Board members and of the Chief Executive Officer.

The remuneration and terms of conditions of employment for the senior executives are in accordance with the Public Service Act 1999 and common law contracts.

The non-executive directors receive the superannuation guarantee contribution required by the government, which is currently nine per cent, and do not receive any other retirement benefits.

Details of remuneration for the year ended 30 June 2011

The total remuneration of the directors and senior executives of the company in 2010–11, and the relevant remuneration bands, are as shown in Table 19.

Table 19: Remuneration of directors and executives, 2010–11

Directors

Remuneration band

Number of directors

 

Nil–$14,999

 1 

 

$15,000–$29,999

 

$30,000–$44,999

 

$60,000–$74,999

Total number of directors

 

Aggregate amount of total remuneration of directors shown above

$255,000

 

Senior executives

Remuneration band

Number of senior executives

 

$160,000–$174,999

 

$175,000–$189,999

 

$190,000–$204,999

 

$205,000–$219,999

Total number of senior executives

 

Aggregate amount of total remuneration of senior executives shown above

$946,000

 

Included in the total number of senior executives is Mr Keith Clarke, General Manager of AHL, who retired on 9 July 2010 and was replaced by Mr Roger Barson (whose title was changed to Chief Executive Officer on 19 July 2011). The Chief Executive Officer is now classified as a full-time office holder and an agency head for the purpose of the Public Service Act 1999.

A new SES Band 1 position was created during the financial year (General Manager—Business Development). The substantive executive management positions include three full-time SES Band 1 officers and the Chief Executive Officer as the full-time office holder.

This report of the directors, incorporating the Remuneration report, is signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Kevin Smith

Chairperson–Board of Directors

Canberra, 19 October 2011

Section 5

Financial statements

Christine Braun, enthusiastic kitchen-hand at Corroboree Hostel—Katherine

5 Financial Statements

Section 6

Appendices

Andy Long and Alex Butler (Fordimail secondary education hostel residents) at Katherine High School

6 Appendices

Appendix 1: Figures and tables

Figures

 

Page

Figure 1

Company structure

11

Figure 2

Outcome and programs

14

Figure 3

The strategic reach of AHL

21

Figure 4

Respondents’ overall satisfaction rating
(company- and community-operated)

22

Figure 5

AHL client needs

43

Figure 6

AHL—enabling Better Lives, Better Futures…

45

Tables

 

Page

Table 1

Board and committee meetings, 2010–11

7

Table 2

Why AHL residents stay with us

13

Table 3

Performance against Portfolio Budget Statements deliverables and key indicators

15

Table 4

Room usage, company-operated hostels and houses (Program 1.1)

15

Table 5

Operating resources and expenditure 2010–11

16

Table 6

Financial comparison, 2006-07 to 2010–11

17

Table 7

Performance comparison, company-operated hostels and houses, 2006–07 to 2010–11

18

Table 8

Performance comparison, community-operated hostels, 2007–08 to 2010–11

19

Table 9

Occupancy rate per night, comparison by program, 2007–08 to 2010–11

19

Table 10

AHL Staff statistics comparison, 2006–07 to 2010–11

20

Table 11

Closing the Gap building blocks

44

Table 12

Staff profile, 2010–11, by APS level

49

Table 13

Diversity of AHL employees

50

Table 14

Recruitment, separation and turnover, 2006–07 to 2010–11

50

Table 15

Employee Assistance Program consultations, 2006–07 to 2010–11

54

Table 16

Notifiable incidents, 2010–11

54

Table 17

Cash on hand and at bank

64

Table 18

Attendance at Board and Audit and Risk Management Committee meetings, 2010–11

71

Table 19

Remuneration of directors and executives, 2010–11

73

Appendix 2: Extract from the Statement of Corporate Intent 2010–11

AHL strategy

The Board has actively pursued new initiatives that maximise AHL’s contribution to the Council of Australian Governments’ Closing the Gap objectives and developed specific priorities (together with an action plan) to promote required changes.

At the core of the Board’s new strategic direction is the following key strategic objective:

Facilitate or provide safe, comfortable, culturally appropriate and affordable special purpose temporary accommodation with tailored support services, to assist Indigenous people to ‘Close the Gap’.

In setting the strategic direction, the Board has identified the following three key themes:

  1. Facilitate ‘wrap-around’ services to lead to independent living
  2. Develop partnerships with public and private sectors
  3. Provide pathways to employment for students and trainees

The Board also identified additional areas of AHL operations which are crucial to the success of AHL as a company, including:

The AHL Board and management recognise the importance of moving the organisation to a position where it is able to better meet the needs of its clients. Partnerships are being formed and pursued. AHL will continue to leverage its position as the primary provider of hostel services for Indigenous people.

Appendix 3: Freedom of information

Statement

Reforms to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (the FOI Act), including amendments to the reporting requirements, commenced on 1 November 2010 and 1 May 2011. This section includes information to satisfy the reporting requirements both pre- and post-reform.

Prior to 1 May 2011, section 8 of the FOI Act required the company to publish detailed information about:

Since 1 May 2011, the company has been required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme. This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8 statement in an annual report. An agency plan showing what information is published in accordance with the scheme’s requirements is accessible on the AHL website at www.ahl.gov.au.

The body of this annual report explains the functions of AHL and issues currently affecting members of the public. They are detailed under each program element. This statement supplements the general information in the body of the report to meet the requirements of section 8 of the FOI Act and was correct as at 30 June 2011.

Freedom of information requests

AHL received no requests under the FOI Act in 2010–11.

How to get access to documents

Anyone is entitled to apply for access to documents under the FOI Act. In many cases, however, you may not need to use the FOI Act. First, try asking the nearest office of the company—the information you want may be readily available. An alternative is to phone the Marketing Section on (02) 6212 2095. If you decide to make a formal request under the FOI Act, please contact the company’s FOI Coordinator during normal working hours on (02) 6212 2030 for assistance.

The general power to grant or refuse access to any document is held by the company’s Chief Executive Officer, who has authorised certain officers of the company to grant or refuse access to documents. Generally, access is provided in the form of copies of documents.

The company can, however, provide a reading area for inspecting documents made available under the FOI Act.

Categories of documents

Files maintained by the company’s offices on a range of topics related to the company’s functions are held in the company’s central registry. Other documents that are common throughout the company are listed below. Those documents marked with an asterisk are available on request free of charge.

Correspondence

Correspondence regarding FOI Act matters should be addressed to:

Appendix 4: Code of Conduct

Code of Conduct actions

AHL uses the following measures to ensure that staff are aware of, understand and apply the Australian Public Service Values and Code of Conduct.

All new employees commencing in AHL are provided with a brochure outlining the Values and Code.

The Values and Code are integrated into training and development activities, including induction and hostel manager training workshops. The relevant model contains material on how the Values and Code should operate in practice.

Significant updates are provided through internal staff notes that address employees’ responsibilities under the Public Service Act 1999.

Investigations

All employees are educated in all aspects of the APS Code of Conduct, including how they can report suspected misconduct, and the protections against victimisation or harassment for them should they do so. Reports of suspected breaches of the Code of Conduct in 2010–11 arose from conduct identified by managers and/or supervisors and work colleagues, AHL’s whistleblowing procedures, and complaints received from members of the public and stakeholders.

Eleven investigations were finalised in 2010–11, a slight increase from 2009–10. The employees involved were the subject of formal investigations conducted under AHL procedures into suspected breaches of the code. Of those investigations, seven found that a breach had occurred and action was taken against the employees concerned.

Results of investigations

Types of misconduct

Appendix 5: Disability strategy

From 1994 to 2010, Commonwealth departments and agencies reported on their performance under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2010–11, the Commonwealth Disability Strategy was overtaken by the new National Disability Strategy, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework for improving life for Australians with disability and their families and carers. The strategy includes new mechanisms for monitoring and reporting on progress, separate from annual reports.

Although annual reports are no longer required to address specific measures of performance in this area, this annual report includes several examples of the agency’s activities to ensure that people with disabilities can readily access its facilities and programs. The Commonwealth Disability Strategy is a framework to assist Australian Government agencies to meet their obligations under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992. Under the strategy, Australian Government agencies are obliged to remove barriers that prevent people with disabilities from having access to policies, programs and services.

The AHL Disability Strategy aims to ensure that all programs and services are accessible to people with disabilities. AHL continues to improve access for residents and visitors with disabilities. All new facilities and major refurbishment projects address disability requirements under the relevant building codes. AHL’s complaints mechanism and the annual resident survey are other avenues that allow concerns about accessibility to be raised and followed up.

Appendix 6: Hostel addresses

Numbers of hostels may be less than those mentioned in other parts of the report, as some mentioned elsewhere were operational during only part of 2010–11 and/or will not operate during 2011–12. Numbers of beds may be greater or fewer than reported for 2010–11 due to graduated opening or closing of beds.

Mulgunya Hostel—Adelaide

Yumba Hostel—Hill End, Queensland

Western Australia

Hostel

Address

Phone

Accommodation type

Budgeted resident capacity

Company-operated hostels and houses

Allawah Grove Hostel

133 Great Eastern Highway
South Guildford WA 6055

08 9279 6646

Transitional

39

Broome Hostel

52 Forrest Street
Broome WA 6725

08 9192 6052

Health (renal)

20

Derbal Bidjar Hostel

6–8 Harrow Street
Maylands WA 6051

08 9371 9090

Transitional

30

Kabayji Booroo Hostel

44–54 Villiers Street
Derby WA 6728

08 9191 1867

Transitional

48

Kununurra Secondary Education Hostel

Lot 302, Victoria Highway
Kununurra WA 6743

08 9169 3598

Secondary education

40

Trilby Cooper Hostel

12–14 Hannan Street
Kalgoorlie WA 6430

08 9021 5549

Transitional

48

Community-operated hostels

7 Mile Rehabilitation Centre (Ngnawar Aerwah)

60 Great Northern Highway
Wyndham WA 6740

08 9161 1806

Substance use rehabilitation

23

Beananging Kwuurt Institute

174–188 Treasure Road
Queens Park WA 6107

08 9350 9973

Tertiary education and training

10

Boomerang Youth Hostel

97 Gregory Street
Geraldton WA 6530

08 9921 6843

Transitional

19

Bunara Maya Hostel

9 Hamilton Road
South Hedland WA 6722

08 9172 2138

Transitional

15

Clontarf Aboriginal Hostel

101A Stirling Highway
North Fremantle WA 6159

08 9433 3185

Secondary education

16

Coolgardie CAPS Hostel

85–93 Lindsay Street
Coolgardie WA 6429

08 9026 6115

Secondary education

33

Karalundi Aboriginal Education Centre

Great Northern Highway
via Meekatharra WA 6642

08 9981 2933

Secondary education

50

Milliya Rumurra Hostel

78 Great Northern Highway
Broome WA 6725

08 9192 1699

Substance use rehabilitation

17

Wongutha CAPS Hostel

625, Lot 3, East Gibson Road
Gibson WA 6448

08 9075 4011

Secondary education

38

Wunan House

167 Coolibah Drive
Kununurra WA 6743

08 9168 2436

Tertiary education and training

11

Northern Australia

Hostel

Address

Phone

Accommodation type

Budgeted resident capacity

Company-operated hostels and houses

Boulter a

22/94 Boulter Road
Berrimah NT 0828

08 8974 0572

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

10

Corroboree Hostel

11 Kirkpatrick Street
Katherine NT 0850

08 8972 2177

Transitional

101

Daisy Yarmirr Hostel

37 Glencoe Crescent
Tiwi NT 0810

08 8927 3866

Transitional

65

Fordimail Student Hostel

Lot 2041 Zimin Drive
Katherine NT 0850

08 8971 1404

Secondary education

32

Galawu Hostel

10 Finniss Street
Darwin NT 0800

08 8981 4106

Transitional

40

Katherine Women’s Medical Hostel

Knotts Crossing Road
Katherine NT 0850

08 8972 3040

Health (antenatal)

10

Lakes

7 Lakes Crescent
Northlakes NT 0812

08 8945 4324

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

5

Nagandji-Nagandji-Ba

14 Verbena Street
Nightcliff NT 0810

08 8985 1548

Health (renal)

18

Nhulunbuy Hostel

Bottlebrush Avenue
Nhulunbuy NT 0880

08 8987 2553

Transitional

41

Silas Roberts Hostel

21 Packard Street
Larrakeyah NT 0800

08 8981 5071

Transitional

56

Tasman

28 Tasman Circuit
Wagaman NT 0810

08 8945 5082

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

5

Community-operated hostels

Dolly Garinyi Hostel

60 Boulter Road
Berrimah NT 0820

08 8922 4808

Substance use rehabilitation

24

FORWAARD

33 Charles Street
Stuart Park NT 0820

08 8923 6666

Substance use rehabilitation

13

Nungalinya College

72 Dripstone Road
Casuarina NT 0811

08 8920 7500

Tertiary education and training

30

Venndale Rehabilitation

Bruce Road
via Katherine NT 0851

08 8971 7199

Substance use rehabilitation

8

a Boulter ceased operations on 12 January 2011.

Northern Queensland

Hostel

Address

Phone

Accommodation type

Budgeted resident capacity

Company-operated hostels and houses

Canon Boggo Pilot Hostel

145–147 Douglas Street
Thursday Island QLD 4875

07 4090 3246

Secondary education

36

Iris Clay Hostel

261–269 Sturt Street
Townsville QLD 4810

07 4772 3649

Transitional

40

Joe McGinness Hostel

234–236 Spence Street
Cairns QLD 4870

07 4051 2141

Secondary education

16

Jumula Dubbins Hostel

60 Victoria Parade
Thursday Island QLD 4875

07 4069 2122

Transitional

37

Kabalulumana Hostel

37–41 Pamela Street
Mount Isa QLD 4825

07 4743 2972

Transitional

40

Kuiyam Hostel

162 Grafton Street
Cairns QLD 4870

07 4051 6466

Transitional

70

Mackay Hostel

49–53 Boddington Street
Mackay QLD 4740

07 4953 3703

Transitional

30

Tonky Logan Hostel

20 Bernarra Street, Rasmussen
Townsville QLD 4815

07 4789 1462

Health (renal)

40

Community-operated hostels

Ferdy’s Haven

Coconut Grove
Palm Island QLD 4814

07 4770 1152

Substance use rehabilitation

16

Gindaja Rehabilitation Centre

Back Beach Road
Yarrabah QLD 4871

07 4056 9156

Substance use rehabilitation

8

Kalkadoon Aboriginal Society House (KASH)

Barkly Highway
Spear Creek
Mount Isa QLD 4825

07 4743 2370

Substance use rehabilitation

45

Mookai Rosie Bi-Bayan

15–17 Valda Close
Edmonton QLD 4868

07 4033 2083

Health (antenatal)

11

Stagpole Street Hostel

7–9 Stagpole Street
West End
Townsville QLD 4810

07 4771 5655

Substance use rehabilitation

21

Western Cape Secondary Hostel

8–12 Yileen Court
Weipa QLD 4874

07 4069 7209

Secondary education

14

Woodleigh Residential College a

40–44 Broadway Lane
Herberton QLD 4872

07 4096 2256

Secondary education

40

a Woodleigh Residential College - AHL ceased funding on 17 December 2010.

Southern Queensland

Hostel

Address

Phone

Accommodation type

Budgeted resident capacity

Company-operated hostels and houses

Arthur

19 Arthur Street
Coffs Harbour NSW 2450

02 6650 0106

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

13

Elley Bennett Hostel

501 Brunswick Street
New Farm QLD 4005

07 3358 1175

Transitional

27

Jane Arnold Hostel

155 Moray Street
New Farm QLD 4005

07 3358 2694

Transitional

30

Musgrave Park Hostel

196 Boundary Road
West End QLD 4101

07 3846 5160

Homeless

15

Neville Bonner Hostel

5 Bridge Street
North Rockhampton QLD 4701

07 4927 3656

Transitional

48

Yumba Hostel

55 Gray Road
Hill End QLD 4101

07 3844 3721

Tertiary education and training/transitional

54

Community-operated hostels

Bidjara Hostel

51 Willis Street
Charleville QLD 4470

07 4654 2599

Transitional

7

Born Free Hostel

27 Brooke Street
Highgate Hill QLD 4101

07 3846 5733

Homeless

10

Bowman Johnson Hostel

5 Oxford Street
South Brisbane QLD 4101

07 3891 2822

Homeless

17

Gamba Lodge

91 Nicholson Street
Dalby QLD 4405

07 4662 5883

Transitional

7

Jesse Budby Healing Centre

27 Llewellyn Street
New Farm QLD 4005

07 3358 8588

Substance use rehabilitation

22

Joyce Wilding Hostel

2371 Logan Road
8 Mile Plane QLD 4113

07 3391 4966

Transitional

21

Milbi Farm

65 Lindleys Road
Etna Creek QLD 4702

07 4934 2828

Transitional

10

Wunjuada Hostel

15 Brambah Avenue
Cherbourg QLD 4605

07 4168 1225

Substance use rehabilitation

9

YAAMBA Men’s Hostel

14 Palm Springs Drive
Bundaberg QLD 4670

07 4159 7535

Substance use rehabilitation

9

New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory

Hostel

Address

Phone

Accommodation type

Budgeted resident capacity

Company-operated hostels and houses

Biala Hostel

38 Lyly Road
Allambie Heights NSW 2100

02 9905 2200

Secondary education for girls

21

Chicka Dixon Hostel

90 Liverpool Road
Enfield NSW 2136

02 9747 4198

Transitional

12

Durungaling Hostel

19 Spruce Street
Lambton NSW 2299

02 4952 4062

Tertiary education and training

10

Ee-Kee-Na Hostel

52 Rockvale Road
Armidale NSW 2350

02 6772 1500

Tertiary education and training

14

Greya

2 Grey Street
Dubbo NSW 2830

02 6885 1846

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

8

Kirinari Newcastle

15 Myall Road,
Garden Suburb
Newcastle NSW 2289

02 4943 4362

Secondary education

14

Kirinari Hostel

340 Box Road
Sylvania Heights NSW 2224

02 9522 8958

Secondary education

30

Ngadu Hostel

321 Livingstone Road
Marrickville NSW 2204

02 9554 7956

Transitional

11

Oxleyb

70 Oxley Circle
Dubbo NSW 2830

02 6881 8459

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

9

Tamworth Hostel

179 Johnston Street
Tamworth NSW 2340

02 6761 3859

Transitional

30

Tony Mundine Hostel

203 Catherine Street
Leichhardt NSW 2040

02 9550 0178

Tertiary education and training

27

Warrina Hostelc

20L Chapmans Road
Dubbo NSW 2830

02 6884 1624

Secondary education

36

Community-operated hostels

Benelong’s Haven

2054 South West Rocks Road
Kinchela Creek NSW 2440

02 6567 4856

Substance use rehabilitation

47

Gu-Dgodah Hostel

270 or Lot 5 Talga Road
Rothbury NSW 2320

02 4930 7760

Substance use rehabilitation

14

Mayaroo Hostel

113 Wine Country Drive
Cessnock NSW 2325

02 4990 9797

Transitional (weekend)

8

Namatjira Haven

108 Whites Lane
Alstonville NSW 2477

02 6628 1098

Substance use rehabilitation

10

Roy Thorne Centre

180 Greenbah Road
Moree NSW 2400

02 6752 2248

Substance use rehabilitation

9

Sheraton House

87 Cherry Street
Ballina NSW 2478

02 6681 6648

Homeless for men

5

The Glen Centre

50 Church Road
Chittaway Point NSW 2261

02 4388 6360

Substance use rehabilitation

18

a Grey ceased operations as a house for people on the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program on 31 January 2011 and the property began operations as a secondary education hostel on 1 February 2011.

b Oxley ceased operations on 31 January 2011.

c Warrina Hostel ceased operations as a secondary education hostel on 31 January 2011 and the property began operations as a house for participants in the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program on 1 February 2011.

Victoria and Tasmania

Hostel

Address

Phone

Accommodation type

Budgeted resident capacity

Company-operated hostels and houses

George Wright Hostel

66 George Street
Fitzroy VIC 3065

03 9419 8648

Homeless for men

12

Geraldine Briggs Hostel

17–19 Wyndham Street
Shepparton VIC 3630

03 5831 7258

Transitional

20

Harry Nanya Hostel

362 Deakin Avenue
Mildura VIC 3500

03 5022 2272

Transitional

13

Kevin Coombs Hostel a

155 Flemington Road
North Melbourne VIC 3051

03 9329 7374

Health

10

New Town

44 New Town Road
Newtown TAS 7008

03 6228 7568

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

8

William T Onus Hostel

75 Westgarth Street
Northcote VIC 3070

03 9489 6701

Transitional

27

Community-operated hostels

Galiamble Half Way House

66 Grey Street
St Kilda VIC 3182

03 9534 1602

Substance use rehabilitation for men

16

Lady Gladys Nicholls Hostel

56 Cunningham Street
Northcote VIC 3070

03 9489 0032

Tertiary education and training/transitional

11

Winja Ulupna Hostel

14 Charnwood Crescent
St Kilda VIC 3182

03 9525 5442

Substance use rehabilitation for women

6

Percy Green Memorial Hostel

Mooroopna–Murchison Road
Toolamba VIC 3614

03 5826 5217

Substance use rehabilitation for men

6

Ronald Cameron Hostel

1416 Sturt Street
Ballarat VIC 3350

03 5331 1415

Transitional

10

Worawa Aboriginal College

60–80 Barak Lane
Healesville VIC 3777

03 5962 4344

Secondary education

32

a Kevin Coombs Hostel - ceased operations on 30 June 2011.

South Australia

Hostel

Address

Phone

Accommodation type

Budgeted resident capacity

Company-operated hostels and houses

Allan Bell House

7 Palmyra Avenue
Torrensville SA 5031

08 8352 6158

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

8

Gladys Elphick Hostel

29 Second Avenue
Klemzig SA 5087

08 8261 6188

Transitional

11

Johnson

34 Johnson Street
Port Augusta SA 5700

08 8642 6658

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

8

Karinga

430 Payneham Road
Glynde SA 5070

08 8336 2525

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

8

Lois O’Donoghue Hostel

34 Johnson Street
Port Augusta SA 5700

08 8642 6658

Transitional

10

Luprina Hostel

2 Clements Street
Dudley Park SA 5008

08 8269 5254

Transitional

20

Mulgunya Hostel

55 Dew Street
Thebarton SA 5031

08 8234 2488

Health (renal)

9

Nindee Hostel

2 Oban Street
Beulah Park SA 5067

08 8332 2352

Transitional

20

Russell

Unit 1, 2 Russell Street
Whyalla SA 5068

08 8642 2081

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

7

Community-operated hostels

Barrie Weigold Hostel

Lot 271 Karoonda Road
Murray Bridge SA 5253

08 8532 4940

Substance use rehabilitation

9

Central Australia

Hostel

Address

Phone

Accommodation type

Budgeted resident capacity

Company-operated hostels and houses

Akangkentye

34 South Terrace
The Gap
Alice Springs NT 0870

08 8952 1713

Transitional

66

Alyerre Hostel

16 Bath Street
Alice Springs NT 0870

08 8952 3857

Health (renal)

40

Apmere Mwerre Visitor Park

15 Len Kittle Drive
Alice Springs NT 0870

08 8952 1754

Transitional

150

Ayiparinya Hostel

Lot 8139 Larapinta Drive
Alice Springs NT 0870

08 8952 4981

Transitional

94

Forrest

6 Forrest Crescent
Gillen NT 0870

08 8953 2369

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

5

Hetti Perkins Home for the Aged

9 Percy Court
Alice Springs NT 0870

08 8952 5811

Aged care

40

Raggatt

3 Raggatt Street
East Side
Alice Springs NT 0871

08 8953 1997

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

6

Sid Ross Hostel

15 Gap Road
Alice Springs NT 0870

08 8952 5781

Health

40

Topsy Smith Hostel

14–18 Renner Street
Alice Springs NT 0870

08 8952 7815

Health (renal)

40

Wangkana-Kari Hostel

Lot 782 Patterson Street
Tennant Creek NT 0860

08 8962 2511

Secondary education

30

Community-operated hostels

CAAAPU

Lot 290 Ragonesi Road
Alice Springs NT 0870

08 8955 5336

Substance use rehabilitation

14

Nyangatjatjara College a

Mala Road
Yulara NT 0872

08 8956 2555

Secondary education

30

a Nyangatjatjara College - AHL ceased funding on 5 April 2011.

Appendix 7: Abbreviations and acronyms

AASB

Australian Accounting Standards Board

AEIFRS

Australian Equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards

AHL

Aboriginal Hostels Limited

APS

Australian Public Service

ASIC

Australian Securities and Investments Commission

CAC Act

Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997

CHG

Community Hostel Grants Program

DEEWR

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (Commonwealth)

FaHCSIA

Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (Commonwealth)

FOI Act

Freedom of Information Act 1982

GST

goods and services tax

IYMP

Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

MP

member of parliament

MOU

Memorandum of understanding

MLA

Member of the Legislative Assembly

NAIDOC

National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. This committee was once responsible for organising national activities during NAIDOC Week and its acronym has become the name of the week itself.

OH&S

occupational health and safety

Ongoing employee

A person engaged as a permanent APS employee as mentioned in paragraph 22(2) (a) of the Public Service Act 1999.

PATS

Patient Assisted Travel Scheme

SES

Senior Executive Service

TAFE

technical and further education

Index

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

Y

For more information about the 2010–11 annual report, contact AHL’s Central Office.

AHL Central Office
Level 2, Bonner House West
7 Neptune Street
Woden ACT 2606

PO Box 30
Woden ACT 2606
Tel: 02 6212 2001
Fax: 02 6212 2022

Email: marketing@ahl.gov.au

© Aboriginal Hostels Limited 2011

This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced in any form without permission from the Chief Executive Officer, AHL, PO Box 30, Woden ACT 2606.

ISSN: 0313-2129

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Editing and indexing by WordsWorth Writing Pty Ltd
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